Tag Archives: Seed Starting

Greenhouse Seed Starting Update June 18, 2016

I did a lot of digging in between episodes this time, which really helped me to move many of the bigger seedlings out of the greenhouse. The tomatoes (except for two) and the peppers were all planted out, along with two of the basil plants. All of the Tiny Tim tomatoes were planted in bigger pots and have taken off since.

I also planted the last of the seedlings that I will be doing this season. I planted zucchini in a medium-sized pot which is likely going to be a little small for a plant of its size, but we don’t have plans to eat a lot of it, so hopefully it will only produce a few fruits.

Believe it or not, I finally moved the goji berries out of the greenhouse so that I could plant some vegetables in the raised bed. The goji berry bed measures approximately 8 feet by 8 feet if you measure from the end of each section to the middle edge. Once I get the leaves in, and some more strawberry plants, I am going to plant strawberries in between all of the goji plants. Along with the leaf mulch, this will help to hold in a bit of water by shading the soil (and leaves) as well as helping me to maximize my space.

I also had to remove what was left of the radishes and turnips that were in the raised bed. Almost all of them were starting to bolt, as the hot weather has made it very hard to keep the greenhouse at a good temperature for cooler weather crops. At least we got a few of each early in the season since I won’t be planting any until the fall because of the root maggots we had last year. I had forgotten to mention about these in the video.

As always, keep on gardening, and thanks for watching (the video is below).

Greenhouse Seed Starting Update May 22, 2016

A little snow doesn’t keep a good gardener down. Well, maybe it does in more tropical regions, but here in Alberta, it’s not uncommon to have a late spring snow storm or two, so it’s just something we all have to learn to deal with.

That being said, we have really been blessed this season with warmer than usual spring weather, and I think that has a lot to do with the seedlings do as well as they have done up to this point. The extra heat could have hurt them in the greenhouse during the day, but I was careful to vent with my fan through the open door to push out as much excess heat as I could. This worked out rather well, but as soon as I get the frame put on each end, I will have an automatic venting fan that will run from a few small solar cells that I bought.

That small project should help loads with my venting issues in the greenhouse, as having a fan against the outer plastic pushing the hot air out, while allowing the cooler, outside air in through the window will be much more efficient at exchanging the air inside the greenhouse. Right now the fan does an alright job, but I can tell come summer that it will require at least one more fan to run it this way, and every extra fan that I need to run in the greenhouse takes away from the purpose of gardening in there as cheaply as possible.

For the update on the seedlings, you can just check out the video below, it will be much easier for you to see them first hand like that than for me to tell you.

As always, keep on gardening, and thanks for watching!

Greenhouse Seed Starting Update May 1, 2016

Even though it has been more than a week since I took the video that this post is named after, and from when the video at the bottom of the page was taken, I figured that I could give a little update about what I did and (mostly) didn’t get done this week in the gardens and greenhouse anyway.

First off, the weather changed and it was very hot for most of last week. Luckily for those tomatoes, I only had to use that blanket once, the rest of the nights it was warm enough to leave them uncovered. That changed this week, though, as the last two nights they have had to be covered, and judging by the forecast, I’m going to have to cover them every night for the near future.

I did come up with a better solution, however, and instead of that big, heavy blanket, I have been covering them with some landscape fabric that sometimes doubles as a shade cloth for me when it gets too hot during the summer. Being a lot lighter, it still seems to hold in some of the heat from the mats, and so far has worked great. I also, just as an extra measure, put a long piece of bubble wrap over the top of the plants on the outside, which may or may not also help, but it gives me a little piece of mind when I go in after covering them.

With all of the heat, I never did get the frames put in like I had planned. I don’t do well in temperatures as hot as it was for most of last week, especially working directly in the sun. To add onto my problems with the heat, when it wasn’t too hot to work, it was too windy to play around with taking off the plastic, or I was too busy with work to get anything done outside at all. I will hopefully get to them soon, though I’m not that worried about them getting in immediately.

I also never did get the broccoli, cabbages, spinach, and kale put out like I had planned, again due to heat, the wind, being busy, and also raspberries. You see, where I’m going to plant them has been taken over partially by raspberry suckers. This wouldn’t be a problem normally, I could just dig them up quickly and toss them, or give them away. This time, however, I want to keep them and replant them at the back of the yard to form a bit of a hedge.

I went out and got a few additions to the yard as well this week: I found a great rain barrel at a garage sale for only $10, that I did have time to set up, and it’s begging for rain just as much as I am. I also bought three more blueberry bushes to go with the four that we already have and two saskatoon berry bushes. That is probably as much as I can do for perennials this season, as the lumber that I bought for the frames and for the rest of the greenhouse changes, along with what I’m planning to spend on a couple of other raised beds has eaten almost all of my budget for the year. You never know, though, I might buy something cheap at the end of the season or something like I tend to.

I’m just not planning on anymore…

Greenhouse Seed Starting – April 17, 2016 Update

It’s time for another look at how the seedlings are doing in the greenhouse with nothing but a heat mat and some hope. So far, so good with this method for me this year, but things are about to change.

It has been three weeks since the first video in the series, and since then we have had weather as low as -10°C (14°F) and as high as 34°C (approximately 93°F). Luckily that 34 didn’t last long, it was on a weird day when I had to keep opening and closing the door, and at some point I didn’t open it fast enough to keep the temperature down. Once the door was opened, though, the temperature dropped to somewhere reasonable quite quickly.

In the last week or so, we only had a couple of nights below freezing, and both ended up being around -8°C (about -18°F). The rest of the nights have been near freezing, but not quite making it down far enough, at least not according to my thermometer inside the greenhouse.

No matter how cold it has been, since the last video, I have changed the heat mats to turn off at 9 AM, and turn back on at 7 PM. After this video, I will be changing the evening time to 8 PM, and for now, I will leave them on until 9, but might drop that down to 8 PM if the temperatures allow it.

As for the plants themselves, the only seeds that never germinated were from the Lemon Balm and the Habanero Peppers, the rest all did great. One of the two Meyer Lemon trees even sprouted, which I wasn’t sure would happen since it took most of a month to happen, but I’m glad it did. I don’t think the ones I overwintered made it.

These seedlings might be the strongest that I have ever produced also, I haven’t had any problems with the plants being leggy, or looking unhealthy, and I have lost only one seedling out of everything I planted. That was my fault as well, I missed covering the tray up completely one night and a jalapeno pepper paid the price for it… Phew, say that three times fast. Everything else has nice thick stems and is growing a lot faster than they ever had when I’ve had them under the grow light in the house.

On April 2nd, I planted eight cells each of Kale and Spinach, eighteen of three different lettuces (more on that in a moment), six cells of Broccoli, and six each of red and green Cabbage. Out of all of the cells, everything sprouted except for one cell of broccoli, and none of the lettuce.

The problem with the lettuce might be one of two things; either my seeds are too old, or I planted them too deep.

The seeds I have for each type of lettuce are about three to four years old, and knowing this, I didn’t bother to over-seed each cell like I should have to guarantee something came up, I just planted two or three seeds in each and walked away.

The other possibility is that I planted them too deep. I’ve had some bad luck with lettuce in recent years, and I am starting to think it might be because I have been planting the seeds at 1/2 an inch deep. I have noticed that most gardeners that I follow on YouTube, or even on gardening shows on T.V. mention that they plant their lettuce seeds at a 1/4 of an inch deep, and they seem to have fantastic results.

When I plant some more later in the season here, I will make sure not only to plant it at 1/4 inch but also over seed it a bit… Unless I buy some new seed, which I just might do.

The transplanting went really well, I didn’t mash any baby seedlings with my big, stupid hands like I usually do, and the only thing that didn’t get planted were the White Alpine Strawberries. I’m going to let them get a little bigger before I put them into a bigger pot, or right out into the planter box they will have soon.

Now only the heat loving plants (tomatoes, basil, and peppers) will be on the heat mats at night. Everything else will just be left on their own with only the greenhouse for cover. I know the spinach, cabbage, kale, broccoli, and strawberries will be fine, but I am slightly worried about the mint, chives, and goji berries being left as is if it manages to get down to -5 or below. I guess we will just have to wait and see what happens.

On April 10th I planted four peas (I forgot to mention them in the video), a half row of Early Snowball Turnips, a half row of Round Scarlet White Radishes, a half row of German Giant Radishes, and I used seed tape to make a half row of Scarlet Nantes Carrots in the raised bed. The peas are situated in the back corner, with two across the back, two down the side, and the turnips and radishes are spread out in the middle with rows that are really too far apart. I couldn’t find my line making stick that I usually use, so that’s part of why the other part is I’m just really not good at eyeballing a line and making it straight for planting. Oh, and the carrots are across the front, and they will get another half row once the Goji Berries are out of the other part of the planter.

Which reminds me, a bunch of the Goji Berries from last year are coming back! I thought I had lost them since I never planted them until October in the greenhouse and by then they were so root-bound that it was hard to know when the roots ended and the soil began. So far I have five or six plants that are leafing out, so hopefully soon I’ll plant them in their spot in the yard.

I was going to talk more about the starting schedule that I have modified from Patrick Dolan’s own seed starting methods, but this post is getting really, really long, so I will save that for another time.

Thanks for reading if you did, and if you’re only here for the video, thanks for watching!

Greenhouse Seed Starting – March 25, 2016 Update

Hello, everyone! I posted this video to YouTube last weekend, but as of yet I have not had the time to write up anything for it other than this. Check back soon for the full write up where I will go into more detail about what I’ve been doing out there! Until then, here’s the video: